Maslow’s Pyramid – Hierarchy of Human Needs PPT

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Powerpoint template with Maslow’s Pyramid — Hierarchy of Human Needs.

Maslow’s hierarchy of needs is a psychological theory that was first suggested by Abraham Maslow in his 1943 publication, “A Theory of Human Motivation,” which is now commonly referred to as Maslow’s Hierarchy or just Maslow. This theory of human motivation went on to become one of the most well-known and frequently disputed ideas of the twentieth century.

According to Maslow, human wants and motivations are divided into five levels, and it is postulated that certain requirements must be met in a specific order — the lowest-level demands must be met before the next level up can be addressed — before the next level up can be addressed. The term “hierarchy” alludes to the fact that these requirements are met in a sequential manner and that not all of them can be met at the same time.

The first level of needs is the physiological level, which includes the need for life and the most fundamental bodily survival. This covers items like food, drink, sleep, and other necessities.

The second level of requirements is that of safety and security, which includes the need for stability, the desire to have a sense of belonging to a group, and the need for health and protection, among others.

This is the third level, which encompasses the need for companionship and closeness as well as the need to feel like you belong.

It is necessary to reach and be recognized at the fourth level, which is characterized by esteem needs.

The fifth level is characterized by self-actualization desires, which include the desire for self-fulfillment, transcendence, or the realization of one’s true potential.

In later years, Maslow broadened the concept to incorporate his observations of people’ intrinsic curiosity for learning. His beliefs are similar to many other theories of human development, some of which are more concerned with explaining the stages of growth in humans than they are with motivating people to act.